Latest News!

Mention the Aviation Museum of NH when you book your stay at The Sleep Inn, Londonderry, NH. We are pleased to refer the Sleep Inn as a prerferred hotel. 

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Become a Member

Help us save our state's historic aviation-related buildings, aircraft, photos and other memorabilia by becoming a member of the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire.

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Volunteer

We are seeking volunteers!

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The 1937 Terminal

Old BuildingIn 1937, this art deco terminal was a bold architectural statement for rural New Hampshire. Built as one of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) projects that sprinkled New Hampshire with unique, useful structures and employed hundreds of Granite State residents, the 1937 airport terminal continued in service until the expansion of Manchester Airport in 1995 slated it for demolition.

Threatened with destruction as Manchester airport expanded its operations, a memorandum of agreement was signed in 1995 by the City of Manchester, the Manchester Airport Director, The Federal Aviation Administration and NH Division of Historical Resources, to preserve the terminal. While serving as a member of the Manchester Airport Authority, Patrick Duffy, then NHAHS's Vice-President, established the fund designated to finance the terminal's move and re-construction as the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire. With unprecedented growth of Manchester Airport, how lucky we were to save The 1937 Terminal from the wrecker's ball.

In 2004, the New Hampshire Aviation Historical Society, Manchester Airport, the City of Manchester and Town of Londonderry, came together to preserve The 1937 Terminal. These groups raised 1.1 million dollars to convert the facility into a museum and educational center.

Awards

In 1995, Manchester Historical Society chose the terminal for its annual preservation award. At that time the survey for application on the State and National Registries of Historic Places was begun. NHAHS completed the documentation required for placement on the New Hampshire Registry of Historic Places and was granted in July of 2004. The Granite State now has a lovely addition to its precious history, as this terminal becomes the only museum in New Hampshire dedicated to the history of aviation.

The Move

The terminal's move from its original location required crossing two active runways to the southeast side of the airport.

The move required accurate coordination between the building movers, airport maintenance staff and the Federal Aviation Administration.

The move began at 6:30 P.M. on Sunday, June 27, 2004.

Pilots who know how sacred the center line is when taking off and landing will appreciate the professional care taken when FAA closed the east west runway for an hour while the terminal crossed, then an hour later, re-opened it for traffic while relinquishing control of the north south runway for the second crossing. This is only the third time in U.S. history that a structure was moved across active runways. The Project Director with Northeast Building Movers informed us that six of the dollies used to move the terminal were also used to move the terminal at Newark Airport.

dawnBy dawn of Monday, June 29, 2004, the terminal was placed within one hundred yards of the foundation where it settled for three days. By June 15th, the terminal was safely resting on the foundation and ready for internal repair work and renovation to begin.

Thanks to the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance's website for some of the information included here about the 1937 terminal move.

McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center Reciprocal Membership in February

During the month of February 2017 (during normal business hours), Aviation Museum of NH Members can visit the Discovery Center by showing their membership card and visa-versa. Some additional/special charges may apply.

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Francis Gary Powers, the U-2 Spy plane, and the Cold War

On February 8, 2017 at 7 PM, the Aviation Museum of NH will host a presentation and book signing by Gary Powers, Jr.  Mr. Powers will discuss the truth behind the U-2 incident in which his father, Francis Gary Powers, survived the shoot-down of his reconnaissance plane and his capture on May 1st, 1960.  Mr. Power’s presentation will include an overview of the Cold War and book signing of the latest edition of his father’s classic 1970 memoir about the notorious U-2 incident. Thank you to the Sleep Inn, Londonderry, NH for sponsorship of this event.

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The Legend of Pancho Barnes and The Happy Bottom Riding Club

February 24, 2017, 7 PM, At the Museum

This is a video documentary profile of one of the most colorful and accomplished female pilots of the early 20th Century. Florence ''Pancho'' Barnes became the first female stunt pilot in Hollywood in 1929 and shattered Amelia Earhart's air speed record in 1930. In the 1940's and 50's, Pancho entertained the best test pilots in the world - men with the right stuff - at her ''Happy Bottom Riding Club'' guest ranch near Edwards Air Force Base.

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